Oct
10

The Ultimate Vision Question

By

Once you have a clear, concise and emotionally-driven 5-year vision for your life, you’ll want to ask yourself a series of critical thinking questions, starting with the one I’ve recorded on this video. Be sure to operate from objective reality and answer as honestly as possible. I’ll look forward to your comments. The early bird deadline to register is October 15, 2012

To register, visit http://www.ssnlive.org/events/

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YOUTUBE

Comments

  1. Jeannette Lynn says:

    I have slowly gotten into the habit of asking myself this question every time I turn on the t.v. Needless to say, that’s a rarity now. I’ve also gotten in the habit of asking myself this question if I find myself bored . . . I’m not bored anymore. There is definitley always something to do and be moving foward on! This is a key question that has really helped keep my discipline in place during those moments of feeling unmotivated. As with all of these critical thinking challenges, it’s a work in progress but the good habit I’ve made is asking myself this question in the first place. It has become such an important question to me that I even have it on my list of things to really hone in on with our high school girls swim team. I’ll be asking them this question so much they’re going to get sick of it but what a great way to get them prioritizing and being realistic about what they truly want to accomplish both in and out of the water!

  2. Steven Yates says:

    I agree with Ronald John Ellis above, because I’ve had similar problems over the years, that boil down to lack of self-discipline. I would expand on his discussion by noting that pinning down what your vision *is*–what you want to communicate that others may hopefully find of value–can be very difficult. It is, however, of paramount importance. After all, if you don’t know what you’re shooting for, you’ll probably end up nowhere near your target. I’ve made my share of what turned out in retrospect to be mistakes–some of them gargantuan!–because I didn’t do enough “homework” & leaped before I looked. It’s probably just as important, therefore, to look at what you believed the goal was, in what respects you fell short of that goal, and why you fell short. Me, I’m still learning, & Steve Siebold’s material has been a huge help! Another point worth noting & emphasizing: for every single one of us, the clock is ticking!

  3. Cy Garrick says:

    I would have to say that I can always upgrade my habits, actions, and behaviors. There are days that go by and they aren’t and there are days where they surpass the previous one. Overall I feel like I am on track with the life that I am actively creating.
    Thanks Steve.

  4. RONALD JOHN ELLIS says:

    Are my habits, behavior and actions congruent with the scope of my 5 year written goals for the future. Are my written goals, clear, concise, correct and complete?

    My honest answer: No.. My specific goals have been dissipated by my compulsive behavior and my need to experience everything in life.

    As Mr. Siebold would say: 3% of Americans have clearly defined written goals, less than 1% can identify their primary goal and objective in life. ……I believe that we as participants in this discussion need to strive to be one of the 1% …..

    The question seem to be designed to cause us to understand that we must put our whole being into fulfilling our desires and goals that lead to World Class Thinking. Then we must assure that we have suitable abilities to meet our goals utilizing critical thinking.

  5. Tim Ware says:

    My ultimate five year vision will suddenly become much more clear after Nov.6th.

  6. Matt Petroski says:

    The vision process is all about connecting to the actions. I would love to say your vision comes without action. I can’t; no one can. The vision will become reality when everything is aligned and focused effort is committed toward the vision. It can not be any other way.

    It is truly a “look into the mirror test”. What I see is a reflection of what I have done. If I am not seeing my vision in the mirror then mental toughtness would require me to ask “why?”. If I truly am focused on that vision then I must adjust my actions.

  7. Matt Harmon says:

    As you point out, Steve, this is really the ulitmate mental toughness question. This is particularly important if you’re self-employed. It can be so easy to get up in the morning and look at yourself in the mirror and say “you deserve to take the day off”.

    Like many aspects of mental toughness, it’s an ongoing battle. It’s always good to have those reminders. Thanks, Steve.