May
22

Mental Toughness Coaching for Basketball and Success

By

I just did an interview on coaching mental toughness in basketball for an organization called CoachingToolBox.net It’s headed up by a coach named Brian Williams, and it’s a world class resource for anyone interested in coaching basketball and improving their performance. Check it out at www.coachingtoolbox.net

Thanks to everyone who commented on the Middle Class Demonization of the Pharmaceutical Industry. Fantastic feedback! (I learned a lot)

I’d like to encourage everyone in this community to pass on the mental toughness message by becoming a mentor or coach to someone. Kids, co-workers, spouses, family members, etc. Your coaching in this area may be the only exposure someone has to the world class philosophy. For assistance, download a copy of my ebook, Coaching 177 Mental Toughness Secrets of the World Class. This book has 1,062 critical thinking questions to ask the person/people you’re coaching. You can read the first 5 chapters at www.coachingmentaltoughness.net   Steve Siebold, CSP, CPCS (5:24)

Comments

  1. Ronnie G says:

    Hey Steve.

    I would like to add a different spin on the word coaching to the discussion. I feel that many people are “coaching” indirectly as well through endeavoring to be personal examples of the principles that are discussed on this blog. This is probably one of the best ways to “teach” people who are personal friends and loved ones, i.e. through living the principles oneself.

    One point you brought up in your post-answer Steve: “I argue that it’s not lack of desire, but lack of belief that most people are missing” really got me thinking. I agree to a great degree, and I think it is the lack of really recognizing what one wants that is the other factor. In the area of career for instance which can be so challenging to identify. What is the career or subject matter you study or work in that will leave you more upbeat and enthusiastic rather than drained after several hours of work? And this of course is right up your ally Steve when it comes to finding one’s emotional motivators.

    Coaching and spreading the message of hope and sound basic principles is the centerpiece of my vision from a long-term perspective, and your message Steve among with material from Jim Rohn, Steven Covey and Martin Seligman forms the centerpiece of my personal philosophy so far.

    Have a great day,
    Ronnie

  2. “What I’ve learned is coaching is about building a mental/emotional blueprint of the student so you know what makes him/her tick. Strategic questioning reveals the performers belief and value system, which serves as a world class coaches guide. It’s the most powerful and most overlooked coaching strategy I’ve seen in 24 years.” — Steve

    You act what you believe which is your vision of life, of the details and the bigger picture.

    Your coaching method is highly individual and personalized even using specific questions, isn’t it? I see what you’re saying about preaching/teaching and coaching. Preaching/teaching might have some motivational or inspirational value but it quickly goes away. Coaching is relational.

    Mike Michelozzi

  3. Steve says:

    Mike,

    I don’t think coaching sports is any different than coaching busines people. I’ve coached million dollar athletes and and billion dollar sales teams, and the process is the same.

    While I agree that the student is important in the coaches success, a world class coach can drive performance in almost any student. (to some level)As someone who coaches Fortune 500 managers every day on how to coach their sales teams, I find that most coaches think what they do is about deseminating information. What I’ve learned is coaching is about building a mental/emotional blueprint of the student so you know what makes him/her tick. Strategic questioning reveals the performers belief and value system, which serves as a world class coaches guide. It’s the most powerful and most overlooked coaching strategy I’ve seen in 24 years. Thats why I wrote Coaching 177 Mental Toughness Secrets of the World Class—to give coaches the EXACT questions to ask in order to learn how the performer thinks—because they ALL think differently!

    Great coaching is 90% research and 10% actual coaching (in my opinion)
    And most coaches I’ve met don’t get it. Thats the reason most of them are earning very little money. Preaching/teaching isn’t worth much. BUT…world class coaching is worth a small fortune.

    Thanks again for yor comment, Mike.

    Steve Siebold

  4. Steve says:

    Jaroslav,

    You make some great points about having at least some face time if possible. I agree with that. I also agree that a big part of the success of the coach is the desire of the student. You gotta want it baby!

    I’ve been accused more than once that our Mental Toughness University process attempts to make world class performers out of people who don’t have the drive to become world class. I argue that it’s not lack of desire, but lack of belief that most people are missing.

    Thanks again for your comment

    Steve Siebold

  5. Steve says:

    Tim,

    I’m really glad you like the 177 Mental Toughness Secrets of the World Class book. It took me over two years to write it.

    Thanks for your comment!

    Steve Siebold

  6. You can’t beat face to face connections in real time real space real people BUT using IT. etc. all the audio/video/live time camera machine to machine changes things.

    Much of my business effort is coaching long distance – we coach and train, mentor and support people all over the world and as good as the coach can be it’s always the student who makes the coach what he or she is – and visa versa.

    Relationships are everything.

    I’ve only coached sports once in my life – middle school track a long time ago. I ran all state sprinting in high school then lost interest in college.

    Mike Michelozzi

  7. Steve,

    I agree that it’s possible to coach on the phone or the internet, but only after a live rapport has been established. I think there has to be some “live” interaction betwen a coach and the client. This is especially true if you do a lot of one on one training or coaching. You say you make 600 coaching calls a year with 30 to 40 people at a time. I’m wondering, is that after you have had some “live” contact with these people? Also what about the 80/20? Are the 20% who are the main producers improving the bottom line or is there a 100% documented improvement across the board?

    The coach knowing what he or she is doing and the coach’s ability to deliver great content is only half of the equation. It doesn’t matter how much they NEED it. You must have a client who really WANTS what the coach is offering. The individual has to believe that the coach knows a better way to improve results and trust that what the coach is suggesting is worth the work. The client’s receptive mind and openness to a new and/or different way thinking is the fertile ground for planting new ideas.

    All my coaches have had greater impact on me after I’ve met them and can visualize their voice as I read their words, or their face when listening to them speak. I think just a few minutes of “face time” goes a long way in future coaching sessions conducted by other means.

    Blessings and Be Well,

    Jaroslav

  8. Tim Dickey says:

    Steve,

    I have become an evangelist for mental toughness as a result of your book. I keep referring people to the book and I’m mentoring them along into world class thinking. I really appreciate the time you took so that I can be world class and help other become champions as well.

    Sincerely,

    Tim